General Frequently Asked Questions

Age is not an issue if you are in reasonably good health and have the desire to continue to live an active healthy lifestyle. You may be asked to see your primary care physician for surgical clearance prior to surgery.
 
 
Most often, the replacement will be loose or wearing of the plastic spacer occurs.
Most surgeries do not have complications however infection or blood clots are the major concerns. Precautions are taken pre-operatively, intra-operatively, and post-operatively to reduce these risks.
 
You will have discomfort following the surgery, but we will keep you comfortable with multiple different approaches to manage pain including appropriate medications.
 
Yes, you should complete the preparation exercises in this booklet as detailed prior to surgery or consult your local physical therapists.
 Most patients go home directly after surgery or stay locally to begin outpatient physical therapy. Some patients will discharge home with home health therapy and/or nursing care.
 
Yes. You should have your Care Partner designated and fully prepared to assist you at home for 1-2 weeks after surgery.

 
 
There are 2 options after surgery.
  1. Return home with your Care Partner and beginoutpatient physical therapy when indicated by your surgeon.
  2. Return home with your Care Partner and begin home health therapy and/or nursing care.
It is your responsibility to have a plan in place for discharge and have a Care Partner(s) to help you with your recovery after surgery.

*ONLY MEDICALLY ELIGIBLE PATIENTS DISCHARGE TO A SKILLED FACILITY FOR FURTHER THERAPY AND RECOVERY*
Your orthopedic surgeon as well as assistant(s) on their team will perform your surgery.
Most patients leave the same day of surgery or the next morning. Getting up the same day of surgery helps to decrease the risk of complications, the amount of time spent in the hospital and helps overall wellbeing.

 
Yes. For 1-2 weeks you will need to use one of the listed assistive devices until you are able to wean safely without limping. Your physical therapist and/or orthopedic surgeon will instruct you in how to wean safely during therapy appointments or your surgeon follow-up appointment.
 
If you desire, you may inquire about equipment to assist with dressing yourself independently with grabbers, reachers or sock aides.
Until you are off of narcotic pain medications and feel safe to operate your operative leg for pedal operation.  
 
You should notify your dentist you have received a joint replacement. Your dentist and surgeon will make appropriate recommendations if you will need antibiotics prior to all dental surgery for the rest of your life.
 
Everyone is unique in the time needed to recover to return to their specific work duties. If you are able to perform your job within your surgical restrictions, you may return as soon as you feel well and with your assistive device. If you are unable to complete your job duties within your restrictions, consult your physical therapist or surgeon to help outline a timeline for return to work.
 
You may resume sexual activity when you feel well enough to do so.
You will have a 2 week and a 6 or 12 week follow up with your surgeon or a team member.
Your specific pain medication instructions will be provided to you upon discharge from surgery. If you have questions or concerns after you have discharged, please call the medication contact number listed on page 27.
 
Alcohol should be avoided while you are taking pain medications as alcohol can alter the effect of medications.
You will wear these stockings for 2 weeks after surgery. It is recommended to take the stockings off every day for 1 hour for washing and performing skin checks.

 

Knee - Frequently Asked Questions

Modern day replacements are made to last several decades. Repetitive impact and heavy loading activities may decrease the longevity of the implant.
 
Depending on the type of incision closure (staples, stitches, or adhesive) you will also have a dressing that will stay on for two weeks.
 
Depending on the type of dressing, you may have a bending restriction for 2 weeks. This is short term and your physical therapist will work with you within these restrictions.
 
Yes, you will either begin outpatient physical therapy or in-home therapy. Once you are safe and able to leave your home, you will begin outpatient physical therapy at a location near you.
 
Within the first 3-4 weeks after surgery and after therapy, you should be applying ice to reduce swelling and pain. After a few weeks, your therapist may have you begin therapy with “warm up activities” but not placing heat directly in your knee.
 
When you are resting, your knee should be straight with the lower leg and ankle elevated on pillows. This position prevents your knee from getting stiff in a bent position.
 

Hip - Frequently Asked Questions

Modern day replacements are made to last several decades. Repetitive impact and heavy loading activities may decrease the longevity of the implant.
 
Depending on the type of incision closure (staples, stitches, or adhesive), you will have a dressing on your incision for two weeks. You will be able to shower with this dressing on.
 
You are recommended to avoid end range of motion of your hip as well as heavy pounding activities (jumping or extreme stretching). You may consult your surgeon or physical therapist with specific activity related questions.
 
Your surgeon will determine when and if you will begin physical therapy after your surgery. This will be based on your deficits prior to surgery and your recovery after surgery.
 
When you are resting, your leg should be in an elevated position on pillows. This position encourages swelling reduction and pain control.
 
Within the first 3-4 weeks after surgery and after therapy, you should be applying ice to reduce swelling and pain. After a few weeks, your therapist may have you begin therapy with “warm up activities” but not placing heat directly in your hip.